Learn Names of Animals in Igbo

 

Learn Igbo Fig 7

 

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Learn Igbo Greetings

 

In Igbo language one of the popular greetings is kedụ which means hello or how are you?
The normal reply would be ọ dị mma meaning fine, thank you.

Many may argue that kedụ ka ọ dị is how are you, yes it is also the case but remember that this is a simple Igbo language being taught.

Another popular Igbo greetings is ndewo,many people use it as a good day, welcome,
good afternoon or good evening.

The normal reply is oga diri gị meaning whatever you wished (whether good day, welcome, good afternoon or good evening) be with you as well.
Although many elder people may reply oga diri gị nwa mụ meaning whatever you wished be with you my child, or my son, or my daughter.

Other popular greetings are nno and dalụ which means welcome or my greetings.
Both greetings (nno and dalụ) are normally used when a person lost for word to greet a person with especially if the person is a stranger.
In some cases, some people use dalụ to say thank you although ịmela is the appropriate word for thank you.

Also kedụ ka imere is another greeting meaning how are you doing?
The usual reply is a di mụ mma meaning I am okay or I am all right.

ka chi fo is used to say good night

ndo is used to say sorry

mba is used to say no

biko is used to say please

biko biko is used to say please please

ekwele mụ or e ya or yaa is used to say yes.

ka omesia is used to say goodbye.

chere mụ is used to say excuse me or hold on.

ka o di echi is used to say see you tomorrow.

ihe oma diri is used to say good luck or best wishes

 

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Learn About Money Matters in Igbo

 

In Igbo language money is called ego

ụlọ ego means bank

akwụkwọ ego means bank notes

aghirigha ego means coins

ahia means market

agara mụ ahia means I went to the market

zuta means buy

azutara mụ ihe meaning I bought something

re means sell or re ihe means sell something

achọrọ mụ izu means I want to buy

kwe onu  means price it or say your price

o di ọnu means the price is high

o di ọnu mma means the price is okay

kwuo ugwo or kwuo ego means pay or pay what you owe or pay money

 

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Learn About Motor Vehicle in Igbo

Learn Igbo Fig 13

In English motor vehicle means something used to transport people or goods.
In Igbo language motor vehicle means moto or ụgbọ.

In English language land means ala in Igbo language.
In English language high up or high in the air means elu in Igbo language.
In English language water means mmịr in Igbo language.

When someone says in Igbo language ụgbọ ala, the person is referring to those motor vehicles that run on the land such as lorries, vans, buses but mostly the person is referring to cars.

When someone says in Igbo language ụgbọ elu, the person is referring to those motor vehicles that run on the air such as helicopters, aircrafts, jets but mostly the person is referring to aeroplanes.

When someone says in Igbo language ụgbọ mmịrị, the person is referring to those motor vehicles that run on the water such as boats, yachts, ferries but mostly the person is referring to ships.

 

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Learn to Greet in the Morning, Afternoon & Evening

 

MORNING GREETING
There are a number of ways used in greeting people in Igbo land in the morning. Greeting people in the morning can be in such forms as:

  • ekene nke ụtụtụ
  • Ị bọọla chi
  • Ị tetala ụra
  • Ị mere aghaa or Ị mere olaa

ekene nke ụtụtụ
Good morning in Igbo translates as  ekene nke ụtụtụ although not every body uses this form of greeting, only a few use it. Those who use it normally put the person's tittle in front of it to make it more perfect and respectful.
For example:
chief, ekene nke ụtụtụ for any chief
nna, ekene nke ụtụtụ for father
nna anyị, ekene nke ụtụtụ for any person you hold high regard like father
nne, ekene nke ụtụtụ for mother
nne anyị, ekene nke ụtụtụ for any person you hold high regard like mother
dede, ekene nke ụtụtụ for uncle
dada, ekene nke ụtụtụ for aunty, etc.

Ị bọọla chi
This is a formal good morning greeting in Igbo language and the usual response is a bọọla mụ chi. To use it, care must be taken on the way it is used because even though it is good morning greeting but it is more or less asking a question that needs a reply. To be precise, ị bọọla chi means "have you waken for another day? Thus, it is appropriate to say bọọla chi to an age met or someone without any title. It is more appropriate to say ị bọọla chi, chief than seeing a chief and just saying ị bọọla chi

ị bọọla chi, chief meaning good morning chief

ị bọọla chi, nna meaning good morning father

ị bọọla chi, nna anyị meaning good morning our father (or used to greet any man old enough to be your father) 

ị bọọla chi, nne meaning good morning mother

ị bọọla chi, nne anyị meaning good morning our mother (or used to greet any woman old enough to be your mother) 

ị bọọla chi, de or dede meaning good morning uncle (or used to greet any man older than you)

ị bọọla chi, da or dada meaning good morning aunty (or used to greet any lady older than you).

Ị tetala ụra
This is also a formal good morning greeting in Igbo language and the usual response is ee tetala m or ee tetala mụ ura (yes, I am awake now or I slept well). To use it, care must be taken on the way your words are structured because even though it is good morning greeting but it is more or less asking a question that needs a reply. To be precise, tetala ụra means "have you waken for the day?" And if you're a young person and said that to an elderly person, he might take an offense, because he might feel you didn't want him to wake up. Thus, it is appropriate to say ị tetala ụra to an age met or someone without any title perhaps. It is more appropriate to say ị tetala ụra, nna anyị (have you waken up our father) than seeing your father and just saying tetala ụra. Thus, it is more appropriate to say ị tetala ụra,

ị tetala ụra chief which means have you waken for the day chief

ị tetala ụra nna which means have you waken for the day father

ị tetala ụra nna anyị which means have you waken for the day our father

ị tetala ụra nne which means have you waken for the day mother

ị tetala ụra nne anyị which means have you waken for the day our mother

ị tetala ụra de or dede which means have you waken for the day uncle

ị tetala ụra da or dada which means have you waken for the day aunty

Ị mere aghaa or Ị mere olaa
This is also a formal good morning; afternoon or evening greeting in Igbo language and the usual response is adị mụ mma (I am okay or fine). To use it, care must be taken on the way it is structured because although it is good morning or so greeting but it is more or less asking a question that needs a reply. To be precise, ị mere aghaa means "how are you?" Thus, it is appropriate to say ị mere aghaa (how are you?) to an age met or someone without any title. It is more appropriate to say:

ị mere aghaa chief which means how are you chief?

ị mere aghaa nna which means how are you father?

ị mere aghaa nna anyị which means how are you our father?

ị mere aghaa nne  which means how are you mother?

ị mere aghaa, nne anyị which means how are you our mother?

ị mere aghaa, de or dede which means how are you uncle?

ị mere aghaa, da or dada which means how are you aunty?.

 

AFTERNOON GREETING
There are a number of ways used in greeting people in Igbo land in the afternoon. Greeting people in the afternoon can be in such forms as:

  • ekene nke ehihie
  • ndeewo
  • Ị dị aghaa or Ị dị aňaa?
  • kedụ ka ị dị
  • ọlịaa

Ekene nke ehihie
Good afternoon in Igbo translates as  ekene nke ehihie although not every body uses it, only a few use this form of greeting. Those who use it normally put the person's tittle in front of it to make it more perfect and respectful.
For example:
chief, ekene nke ehihie for any chief meaning chief good afternoon

nna, ekene nke ehihie for any father meaning father good afternoon

nna anyị, ekene nke ehihie for a person you hold high regards like father - our father good afternoon

nne, ekene nke ehihie for mother meaning mother good afternoon

nne anyị, ekene nke ehihie for a person you hold high regards like mother - our mother good afternoon

dede, ekene nke ehihie for uncle meaning uncle good afternoon

dada, ekene nke ehihie for aunty, meaning aunty good afternoon.

Ndeewo
This is a formal good afternoon greeting if it is said in the afternoon, except if it is said in the evening, it can equally be a good evening greeting. When ndeewo greeting is said, the usual response would be ndeewo (good afternoon). However if ndeewo is said to an adult by a child, the normal response would be ndeewo nwamụ (good afternoon my child).
To make your greeting respectful, it is wise to include ndeewo nna or ndeewo nee or any of the appropriate: chief, nna, nna anyị, nne, nne anyị, de, dede, da or dada.

Ị dị aghaa or Ị dị aňaa
This is also a formal good afternoon greeting if it is said in the afternoon, apart from, if it is said in the evening, it can equally be a good evening greeting. When ị dị aghaa or ị dị aňaa greeting is said, the usual response would be adị mụ mma (I am fine or all right).
To make your greeting respectful, it is wise to include appropriate title at the end like: ị dị aghaa, chief or ị dị aňaa, chief, nna, nna anyị, nne, nne anyị, de, dede, da or dada.

Kedụ or kedụ ka ọ dị or kedụ ka ị dị
This is a formal greeting at any time whether in the morning, afternoon or in the evening. Nonetheless, it is mostly used in the afternoon and in the evening. Most people may just say kedụ instead of saying the whole thing - kedụ ka ọ dị or kedụ ka ị dị. When kedụ or kedụ ka ọ dị or kedụ ka ị dị (how are you?) greeting is said, the usual response would be adị mụ mma (I am fine or okay).

Ọlịaa
This is normally a casual greeting at any time whether in the morning, afternoon or in the evening. But more appropriately in the afternoon and in the evening. Ọlịaa is appropriate if the person you are greeting is your age met, if say it is one another or if it was an older person saying it to a younger person, but it is inappropriate if a younger person said it to an older person. Ọlịaa means "how is it?" and the usual response could be: ọ dị mma (it is all right).

 

EVENING GREETING
There are a number of ways used in greeting people in Igbo land in the evening. Greeting people in the evening can be in such forms as:

  • ekene nke ebali
  • ka chi bọọ
  • ka chi foo
  • ndeewo (see afternoon greeting)
  • Ị dị aghaa or Ị dị aňaa (see afternoon greeting)
  • kedụ ka ị dị (see afternoon greeting)
  • ọlịaa (see afternoon greeting)

Ekene nke abali
Good evening in Igbo translates as  ekene nke ebali although not every body uses it, only a few use this form of greeting. Those who use it normally put the person's tittle in front of it to make it more perfect and respectful.
For example:
chief, ekene nke ebali for any chief - meaning chief good evening

nna, ekene nke ebali for father - meaning father good evening

nna anyị, ekene nke ebali for a person you hold high regards like father - meaning our father good evening

nne, ekene nke ebali for mother - meaning mother good evening

nne anyị, ekene nke ebali for any person you hold high regard like mother - meaning our mother good evening

dede, ekene nke ebali for uncle - meaning uncle good evening

dada, ekene nke ebali for aunty - meaning aunty good evening.

Ka chi bọọ
This is the normal evening greeting especially if it is very late in the evening. Ka chi bọọ means (till the morning). The normal response is the same, Ka chi bọọ meaning (till the morning).

Ka chi foo
This is also the normal evening greeting Ka chi foo means (till the morning or till the morning comes). The normal response is the same Ka chi foo (till the morning or till the morning comes).

Other Greetings

Ka ọ dị (keep well) response ọ ga dị (it will be well)

Ka ọ mesịa (goodbye) response Ka ọ mesịa (goodbye)

Kaa kwa nka (live long) response ag mụ akaa nka (I will live long)

Rahụ ụra nke ọma (sleep well) response ag ma arahụ ura nke ọma (I will sleep well).

Ị lawala (are you going) response eya, a lawala mụ or eh, a lawala mụ (yes, I am going)

Laa nke ọma (go gently) response ag mụ alaa nke ọma (I will go gently)

Gaa nke ọma (go well) response ag mụ agaa nke ọma (I will go well)

Ije ọma (safe journey) response ag mụ agaa ije ọma (I will reach safely)

Jee nke ọma (travel well) response ag mụ agaa ọma (I will travel well)

Lezie anya ofọma (keep well) response ag mụ lezie anya ofọma (I will keep well)

Ihe ọma dịrị gị (good things be with you) response Ihe ọma ga a dịrị mụ (good things will be with me)

Jisie ike (try well) response ag mụ ejisie ike (I will try well)

Chukwu ga gọzie gị (God will bless you) response Chukwu ga gọzie mụ (God will bless me)

Ị meela (thank you) response emeela mụ (am also thankful)

Ị zọọla mụ (you have helped me) response eya zọọla ngị (yes, I have helped you).

 

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Learn Igbo Market Days

 

Traditionally Igbo week consists of four days, which is normally four market days: Eke, Orie, Afo, Nkwo.

Every town in Igbo Land has its own market day. For example, Umuaka town might have their market day as Eke, while Akpala town has its own market day as Orie. Amaike town might have their own market day as Afo, and Uloise town has its market day as Nkwo. Therefore before the supermarkets, malls, shops or shopping centres, I am talking of 1700s and 1900s, if say for example, today is Afo market day, then it means every body from Umuaka, Akpala and Uloise towns will head to Amaike town market to sell or buy all their needs. Likewise, if today for an example is Eke, it means every body from Amaike, Akpala and Uloise towns will head to Umuaka to sell and buy all their needs.
To buy and sell means that people who produced more yam in their farms may sell the yam to have money to buy oil or meat in the market. Likewise, people who grew a lot of vegetables may want to sell them to buy yam, fish or other things. This is traditionally how Igbo Land used to live in those days.
If a person is not strong enough to go to different markets every day, it means, the person will wait for four days when it will be the turn of the local market to open.

 

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Learn the Name of Days, Weeks, Months and Year

A day or today is called ubochi
Tomorrow
is called echi
Tomorrow morning
is called ụtụtụ echi
Tomorrow afternoon
is called ehihie echi
Tomorrow evening
or night is called abali echi

Yesterday is called ubochi gara aga
Yesterday morning
is called ụtụtụ ubochi gara aga
Yesterday afternoon
is called ehihie ubochi gara aga
Yesterday evening
or night is called ubochi gara aga

A week is called ize uka
This week
is called ize uka nkaa
Last week
is called ize uka gara aga
Next week
is called ize uka na abia abia

A month is called ọnwa
This month
is called ọnwa nkaa
Last month
is called ọnwa gara aga
Next month
is called ọnwa na abia abia

January is called Ọnwa Mbu or Ọnwa Otu
February
is called Ọnwa Abua
March
is called Ọnwa Atọ
April
is called Ọnwa Anọ
May
is called Ọnwa Ise
June
is called Ọnwa Isii
July
is called Ọnwa Asa
August
is called Ọnwa Asatọ
September
is called Ọnwa Itoli
October
is called Ọnwa Iri
November
is called Ọnwa Iri na Otu
December
is called Ọnwa Iri na Abụọ

A year is called afo
This year
is called afo nkaa
Last year
is called afo gara aga
Next year
is called afo na abia abia

 

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